19
Aug
14

Creating Bat Kid

Working out the mask.

Working out the mask.

I recently received a prospectus in the mail from a local art center. This prospectus is for an all-Halloween exhibit that sounded like too much fun for me to pass up. The deadline for submissions is the end of August, so if I was going to participate I needed to get moving.

When I was kid growing up in Toronto, Ohio, Halloween was a really big deal to me and my buddies. Over the years, I went trick or treating in a variety of costumes, some homemade and some store bought. One of my favorite comic book heroes was Batman, and while I never spent a single Halloween as the “caped crusader”, I knew right off that I wanted to create an image of a kid wearing a Batman mask.

A couple of weeks back I purchased a 46″x40″ oak framed blackboard at Rogers Flea Market in Ohio. The blackboard itself was not slate, but rather plywood painted flat black. This rascal is heavy, but I knew it was just right for building a tin piece on, and it was priced at only ten bucks! (A little added note: the back of the blackboard is stamped “Property of US Post Office 1966″.) I decided this would be the support I would use to create my “Bat Kid”.

I have included a slide show of how Bat Kid evolved. What you are looking at is about 24 hours work over a three day period. The weather cooperated and I was able to work on the entire piece on the brick patio outside of my studio. He is repurposed metal and nails, with the frame painted in blue enamel. And although we are not done with summer quite yet, let me be the first to wish you a Happy Halloween!

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06
Jul
14

Rogers is Bonkers on July 4th!

Selfie in the middle of the Rogers madness!

Selfie in the middle of the Rogers madness!

I had not planned to go back to Rogers only one week after my previous trip, but my son and a friend were interested in going. As sometimes happens, I ended up making the drive myself, all the time thinking I should be in the studio. However, Rogers was going gang busters and I did find tin and other materials.

Just a portion of the huge Rogers crowd.

Just a portion of the huge Rogers crowd.

I had never been to Rogers on July 4th, and what an experience! It seemed every dealer space was filled, and there were even dealers set up in grassy areas where I had never seen set-ups before. The people were shoulder to shoulder, and just walking at any more than a crawl was difficult. When you did see something you wanted to look at closer, you had to push your way in and push your way back out. Craziness!

A half dozen table into the flea market and this caught my eye.

A half dozen table into the flea market and this caught my eye.

The first thing I saw that brought me to a full stop was a West Virginia Centennial license plate topper. I looked at it, told myself I did not need it, and walked away. About 100 feet down the row I turned around, went back to the table where the WV piece was, and purchased it after a little haggeling. I knew this would not be going into any artwork, but something that would just look good on the wall.

If only all the cans were a buck!

If only all the cans were a buck!

I started finding a few tins here and there, some old, some new, but all with usable color or texture for future art pieces. Then I stumbled upon two plastic roosters in their original cartons! Oh joy! Now I think there is something funky about plastic roosters wearing their cardboard boxes. They were six bucks for the pair and ……drum roll please…… made in the USA!

What will my wife and I do with these critters? I have no idea. Coincidently, I am currently reading the book “Never Stop to Think….Do I Have a Place for This?”, by Mary Randolph Carter. This book is helping me realize that either I am not crazy, or that there are a lot of crazy people in the world just like me.

Two plastic Rocky-the-Roosters in my wagon! Ha!

Two plastic Rocky-the-Roosters in my wagon! Along with them are a few tins that will be going under the shear back at the studio.

Would you believe that while my wagon was parked in front of another dealer’s space that a woman tried to purchase them? The dealer almost seemed offended and quickly replied, “Mam, those are NOT mine!”. At another dealer’s space I was purchasing some metal and I came back to my wagon to see that one of my roosters were gone. Yes, GONE! I searched the ground quickly to see if it had fallen out. Then I notice a nearby six year old boy holding it and showing it to his mother in the hopes that she might buy it. I got my rooster back.

My regular breakfast stop at Rogers.

Now about this time I start getting hungry for breakfast and that means a stop at Paisano’s. If you read my blog with any regularity, you already know how much I like this pizza. It is the bomb! I lucked out, as it was fairly early and the line had not become too long yet. I got one slice to eat now and a slice to eat a while later. Oh yeah!

My mother taught me to always eat a proper breakfast while at the flea market!

My mother taught me to always eat a proper breakfast while at the flea market!

Deborah Butterfield knockoff?

Deborah Butterfield knockoff?

You just never know what you are going to see at the flea market. In this case, a kitschy version of a Deborah Butterfield horse. Please go to a museum and see a Butterfield piece FOR REAL!

The crowd grows bigger!

The crowd grows bigger!

I considered heading back to Wheeling after just a few hours because just getting through the crowd was getting difficult. It was actually becoming problematic to just get in and out of booths to look at things.

Waiting to be adopted.

Waiting to be adopted.

As I headed back to my truck I stopped to look at a few things, most of which I did not purchase. However, I did pick up a few highway signs from a dealer and these will find a new life back at the studio.

As I loaded the truck for the drive back home, I noticed this cute little trailer parked near by. Now, I was thinking, THAT is the way to visit flea markets!

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27
Jun
14

Got Art Materials? Rogers Does!

 

I always seem to feel bad for the deer who have ended up as hunting trophies.

I always seem to feel bad for the deer who have ended up as hunting trophies.

Lately it seems that the Fridays I had free to visit Rogers were filled with rain, and when it didn’t rain I had other obligations. Finally the stars and moon aligned and today was a Rogers day! I headed up early this morning, joined by friend and former student, Eric Price. As always, you just don’t know what is going to show at Rogers. Today was a particularly good day for metal and a particularly bad one for deer. Unless you wanted a deer head for hanging on your wall, then I suppose it would have been a very good day for you. I don’t quite understand the animal-parts-on-a-wall mentality. I don’t judge, but I do think it’s weird.

A life-size Barbie!

A life-size Barbie!

Not often do I run across a life-size Barbie doll. I guess I’ve NEVER seen a life-size Barbie until today! According to the present owner, our nearly six foot tall plastic friend was made for Bloomingdales back in 1984. Big Barbie was not priced, and I didn’t ask what the dealer was asking for her. In hindsight, I am a bit curious what the owner thought his Barbie was worth. Oh well!

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Lots of stuff look at today!

I was able to find several cans with good color or interesting patterns, along with a stack of what appear to be uncut Coca-Cola playing card box lids. Each one shows a woman from an old Coca-Cola ad. I am unsure how I will use them, but I am thinking they will make good patterns for backgrounds. We’ll see what happens.

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First load of “art materials” back to the truck. The aforementioned Coca-Cola uncut lids can be seen in front of the electric drill display board.

Now all this walking and looking and buying art materials causes one to work up an appetite. There is no better place to fill your belly at Rogers than at Paisano’s Pizza! I used to hear my dad use the term “paisano” when he would run into a friend back in Steubenville, Ohio. It means countryman or brother in Italian, and is the equivalent of “homie” to Italians and Italian-Americans. But I degres. I love pizza: the taste, the smell, the sight of a piping hot slice. Finding a good slice of pizza is not always easy, and finding good pizza at a flea market is almost unheard of. However, Paisano’s is the real deal!

Damn good pizza!

Damn good pizza!

I had to take a bite before I took this photo!

I had to take a bite before I took this photo!

Stomachs full, we get back to the job at hand: more walking and more looking at junk!

 

Artist Eric Price. You can check out Eric's work HERE.

Artist Eric Price, looking for anything that can be turned into a sculpture tool. You can check out Eric’s work HERE.

Dealer offering 1950s-60s magazines.

Dealer offering 1950s-60s magazines.

 

Instant relatives.

Instant relatives.

Yes, even more deer heads. Perhaps their spirits are trying to comfort one another.

Two more deer heads, appearing to be comforting one another.

Near noon the sun is strong and Rogers is heating up. Time to take the last load to the truck and call it a day. Until next time, stay junky my friend, and don’t forget that the flea market can also be your “art materials store!”

Last load of the morning.

Last load of the morning.

 

 

 

 

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25
Jun
14

Wheeling Arts Fest 2014

Chris speaking with our friend, Robert Peterson, shortly after the morning rain stopped.

Chris Villamagna speaking with our friend, painter Robert Peterson, at our booth shortly after the morning rain stopped. Five of my pieces went to new homes by the end of the day. Robert Peterson has been working on a painting series of the urban landscape of Wheeling. In 2012 Robert and I had a joint exhibition titled “Growing Up in Black and White”.

The fourth annual Wheeling Arts Fest was held Saturday, June 21 on and around the campus of West Virginia Northern Community College in downtown Wheeling, WV. This event is presented by the City of Wheeling Arts and Cultural Commission,of which my wife Chris, and I, are part of. The Arts Fest is an admission-free event that offers a wide variety of arts and cultural programs, including live music, artist market, theatre, dance, spoken word, culinary demos, free artist workshops in a variety of media, and much more.

These guys are now the proud owners of a Villamagna.

These guys are now the proud owners of a Villamagna.

Artist Bob Sako was my neighbor at Arts Fest.

Artist Bob Sako was my neighbor at Arts Fest.

Artist Liz Neuman shows off a pastel painting that she purchased from Bob Sako.

Artist Liz Neuman shows off a pastel painting that she purchased from Bob Sako.

Shortly after getting our booth up the rain came! It rained hard and steady for about 30 minutes, keeping away only the hardiest of visitors. Luckily, the rest of the day was cloudy yet dry, permitting Pittsburgh’s Squonk Opera, one of the headline acts of Arts Fest, to draw a big crowd at each of their three performances.

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Squonk Opera!

Arts Fest visitors enjoy Squonk Opera.

Arts Fest visitors enjoy Squonk Opera.

Sqonk Opera continued to amaze and delight!

Sqonk Opera continued to amaze and delight!

Another big hit at Arts Fest was the high energy Cello Fury.

Another big hit at Arts Fest was the high energy Cello Fury.

In addition to these performers, Arts Fest visitors enjoyed Gallowglass, vocalist Linda Cowan, the Tunnel Green Duo, New Age Adenas, Allegro Dance Company, Paie o’Docs, the National Pike Pickers, and more.

Thats me on the left, ceramic artist Lambros Tsuhlares center, and the amazing Roy on the right.

Thats me on the left, ceramic artist Lambros Tsuhlares center, and the amazing Roy on the right. As our dear late friend Paul Padgett used to say, “If you want to get noticed, make it big, and if you can’t make it big, make it red!”

West Virginia Poet Laureate Marc Harshman in the Literary Arts tent.

West Virginia Poet Laureate Marc Harshman in the Literary Arts tent.

No Arts Fest is complete without a visit from Stewie!

No Arts Fest is complete without a visit from Stewie!

Sculptor Eric price checks out paintings by artist Victoria Lavorini.

Sculptor Eric Price checks out paintings by artist Victoria Lavorini.

At the end of the day, the 4th annual Wheeling Arts Fest could be labeled a huge success! Many thanks to the Wheeling Arts and Cultural Commission, it’s volunteers, sponsors and all the artists and performers who helped make it happen!

 

 

21
May
14

Bull Creek Mud Bog

The early morning at the Bull Creek Fleatique was a bit muddy.

Early morning at the Bull Creek Flea-tique was a bit muddy.

 

The first Bull Creek Flea-tique of the year took place this past Sunday, and I was looking forward to finding some fresh art materials! In my excitement for “opening day”, I did not take into account that the previous week had been a rainy one. Sure, I figured the grass would be a bit damp, but I was ill prepared for surface conditions at Bull Creek. It was muddy. Saying it was muddy does not seem enough. The field was pure muck. The ground was pure sludge.  The rainy weather had turned the flea market into a quagmire, and I had left my rubber boots in a closet at home. (Note to self: always keep a pair of boots in back of truck.)

The highlight of my trudging through this bog was finding a fifty pound shortening can with the name “Roberts” across the front. A friend pointed out that there was no apostrophe, but I still thought of the can has having my name on it. In addition, I picked up a metal canister set that had recipes printed on the surface (good texture material in a tin piece); a metal sign that reads “Hevi-Duty” (that may be a title for a piece); and some miscellaneous assemblage items.

Trying to leave the flea market was a bit challenging. Dozens of vehicles were stuck, while others were being pushed out of the muck by teams of volunteers. A tow truck had arrived and I am sure he was quite busy throughout the remainder of the morning. Leaving through the normal exit road was impossible as several stranded vehicles had created gridlock. I cut across the muddy field to reach the entrance road which was in a bit better condition. I was thankful for my four-wheel drive vehicle! 

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02
May
14

Roger’s: A Sign of Spring

Morning at Rogers Flea Market

Morning at Rogers Flea Market

Most of you that know me, or at least know this blog, are aware that I love flea markets. I often say that “The flea market is my palette.”. The majority of my art work is comprised of repurposed lithographed metal and found objects, and I obtain most of these materials at the flea market. My favorite outdoor market is in Rogers, Ohio, about 90 minutes north of our home in WV. This past April 18th, my wife, Chris, and I headed to our first Rogers experience of the year. This is truly one of the signs that spring has arrived. We took two friends along with us, Nancy Tirone and Rebekah Karelis, both “Rogers virgins”.

Me, Chris, Bekah, and Nancy ready for our Rogers experience!

Me, Chris, Bekah, and Nancy ready for our Rogers experience!

To give you a little more info on Rogers, here is a blurb from their website:

A Friday visit to the Rogers Community Auction and Market is more than a buying spree. It’s a refreshing dip into rural Americana. Shoppers spill into the gravel walking paths between rail fences that guide shoppers through the maze of tables and between pavilions and barns.

Join the early morning walkers who measure their miles in the gravel aisles for exercise before they shop. The grounds open for business at 7:30 a.m. and vendors start setting up at least an hour before. Those who want to register for the afternoon auctions begin signing in at 7:30.

There is no admission charge and 70 acres of free parking is available. There is no dress code but good walking shoes are recommended if you plan to cover the entire three miles of aisles through the barns and outdoors. The 1,000 to 1,600 vendors, selling an A to Z conglomeration of goods, are randomly scattered so that there is a good variety in each aisle.

We had a fun day at Rogers, but that might be better said through the following photos!

 

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12
Apr
14

Mixed Media Art on a Stick!

The annual West Liberty University MAD Fest was held on Friday, April 11, with Professor James Haizlett orchestrating the event. Each year I am asked to teach a mixed-media workshop that is geared towards high school art students and their teachers. For the past two years I presented an altered photograph workshop based on the work of artist Alex Gross. I had seen Alex’s exhibition at the Jonathan Levine Gallery in NYC in the spring of 2012, which inspired the direction of my workshop.

This year I wanted to change things a bit,  just in case one of the visiting students might be returning to my workshop for a second year. Last fall I saw the work of artist Tom Sarver in the 2013 Carnegie International. By chance, my wife, Chris, and I got to meet Tom at the recent Out of Hand event at Contemporary Craft in Pittsburgh. He was there helping event visitors to make their own puppet, and I enjoyed making one myself.

It was about a week before MAD Fest and I still was not sure what I would present. At this point I am just listed in the MAD program as Robert Villamagna: Mixed Media Workshop. My experience with Tom Sarver at Contemporary Craft got me thinking about creating a one hour mixed-media workshop using a stick as the primary vehicle for the artwork.

The "Mixed-Media Art on a Stick" examples I made for the workshop.

The “Mixed-Media Art on a Stick” examples I made for the workshop.

I made a few puppet-like mixed-media examples earlier in the week to hopefully inspire my workshop students. From left to right: The first guy made up of a deconstructed shipping carton, a foamcore head, Sharpie, and miscellaneous scraps, arms are attached with nuts and bolts; the deer head is a piece of plywood, with plastic bread shelving cut into the shape of antlers, acrylic paint, nails, and Sharpie; the skeleton head is foam core with black mat board scrap for eyes, etc., his body and is cut from a plastic beach bottle, arms attached with a rivet tool; and meat head man is a photo copy of meat on foam core, his body is black mat board scraps, arms are attached with nuts and bolts.

My two workshops were scheduled begin at 1 PM and 2 PM. Early that morning I spent about four hours preparing the studio with labeled bins of sticks (wood lathe), cardboard scraps, cloth scraps, plastic detergent bottle pieces, plastic caps, colored and textured paper, etc. I set up a hot glue station with several glue guns, as well as a station for drilling and riveting. I was able to offer a huge assortment of colored and textured mat samples which a student of mine intercepted from the Micheal’s craft store dumpster. (Thanks Amanda!) At each table I had scissors, Tacky Glue, and an assortment of Sharpies. Due to the limited timeframe, I decided at the last minute not offer paint as an option. Even with a hair dryer on hand, paint takes time to dry and with only fifty minutes to work I felt it better to leave paint out of the equation.

Overall, I felt the students were energized, creative, and having a good time. About fifteen minutes into each workshop the studio became a beehive of activity. A special thank you to my WLU student assistants: Kevin, Jessica, and Alex! Here are some photos from my back-to-back workshops:

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